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Artscale Pre-Heresy Terminator

So here is a Pre-Heresy Terminator armed with Lightning Claws (of the Alpha Legion). The claws took a while to get right, my first attempt made them with the fingers too long so I removed a few joints from the lightning claws to shorten them. The rest of the model followed my standard method of construction, although I have to admit the shoulder pads were tricky.

At first I attempted them in plasticard but wasn’t happy with the result and so fell back on GS simply because I’m more confident with it. The claws were originally going to be used as masters to have cast, but I’m making another set for that purpose (more fitting for regular scale models). You’ll find a Mini-Tutorial on sculpting Alpha Legion icons here.

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April 20, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Amazing work, as always.

    I often wonder with your sculpts why you bother using original parts. With a model such as this, where 90% or more is sculpted from greenstuff, why not go the rest of the way and sculpt everything? Surely it would give you a lot more freedom in terms of poses, facial expressions and so on, and it seems like a lot of effort to blend the plastic and GS together to appear at the same scale. This isn’t to denigrate your work in any way, I think it’s fantastic, I’m mostly just curious how much additional work it would really be for you to fully sculpt a model.

    • http://masteroftheforge.com Lamenter

      That’s a good question.

      It’s largely a case of making life easier and partly because it helps to keep all the conversions within certain strict proportions. 

      There’s also the undeniable fact that Games Workshop does still produce very high quality sculpts. I’m not trying to compete with that I’m essentially just tweaking what are already great models.

      If they were 100% sculpted I think I’d often have a hard time knowing how to proceed. The restrictive element of using original bits is (at least for me and my process) actually quite helpful. A bit like the difference between a blank piece of paper and one with a penciled rough sketch, the later gives you a jumping off point.

      Or if you want a simple answer, I’m rubbish at sculpting faces. :-)

      • Anonymous

        That makes a lot of sense. Thanks! :)

  • Erich1234562002

    One question if you dont mind is there a diffrence between Artscale, truescale, and actualscale? And if so what is it? please ( I know Its really two) sorry

    • http://masteroftheforge.com Lamenter

      Here’s how I define them:

      Truescale: the most commonly thrown around term for bigger Space Marines. The term Truescale refers to a model that’s scale within its own proportions is accurate and most lifelike (only in miniature form). GW miniatures adhere to an exaggerated “heroic” scale whereas many historical miniatures remain Truescale. With reference to Space Marines the first issue with making them Truescale is correcting the abdomen and legs to make them more realistic looking, the overall size of the miniature is less relevant. There are very few True-Truescale Space Marines, in part because there is a lot of disagreement about a Space Marine’s actual proportions. The term Truescale is commonly used to just mean bigger Space Marine models most of the time.

      Actual Scale: a term coined to refer to an attempt to make marines that are proportionally in scale with the other miniatures of the 40k universe. In essence you put your Space Marines on the table and you want them to tower over your enemy’s guardsmen (or whatever) just like they do in the fiction. This is what most “Truescales” actually are.

      Artscale: my own variation on Actual Scale. This is all about making miniatures more true to GWs artwork and the description given in the fiction. Artists like Alex Boyd rarely ever fail to inspire me, and I want my miniatures to capture some of that inspiration. For me this is not just about having a mini the right height, or size, but also giving it a sense of mass/weight and movement via considered posing. The emphasis is on using artwork as a guideline for conversions.

      For me personally I have no interest in proper Truescaling as I always find heroic scaled miniatures (GW minis are heroic scaled) far more appealing, even though they’re technically less accurate (big hands, big feet). All my scaled up conversions on this site are Artscale conversions.