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Artscale Mark VIII Deathwatch

Artscale Mark VIII Deathwatch

This is only my second Mark VIII power armour conversion. The first work in progress pic below shows the three basic components (legs, torso and head) assembled and based to give an early impression of how the final model will look. Normally I make the legs and torso separately and assemble later but I think doing it this way is probably a lot better. The components basically form a skeleton onto which you can sculpt the surface details. Because the surface needs to be highly polished it is best to treat the “skin” of the model as a separate part of the process to the structure underneath. If you try to establish structure and surface detail at the same time you make it twice as hard for yourself.

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This guy is an Imperial Fist of the Deathwatch, carrying a Storm Shield and Thunder Hammer. The Thunder Hammer is a modified version of Lysander’s weapon and the shield is a FW Black Templar Storm Shield with all the detail removed. To do this I first removed as much detail as I could with clippers and a knife being careful not to damage the shield itself. Because of the harmful nature of resin dust I took some fine grade wet&dry paper and sanded it off under a running tap (not hot water) until I had a smooth finish. This way the dust is just washed away harmlessly, leaving your lungs intact.

The Imperial Laurel on his helm was done very easily with a bit from one of the Space Marine box sets. Find a Tutorial here.

I really wasn’t sure how well this model was going to turn out, but now I’ve finished it I have to admit that it pains me to part with him. Rather than repose the legs I simply based him on a slight slope, and stuck with the out the box pose of the legs. This approach is a simple way a huge difference without having to chop up legs. Making Mark VIII armour requires a little more attention to detail but isn’t so different from Mark VII to be a big issue. Most of the rest of the model is standard procedure, building a base model on which to sculpt a “skin”.

I didn’t have a second Deathwatch terminator pad (found in the box sets) spare so I cast another one using a Blu-Stuff one piece mold which I then cut up a little to add an Imperial Fist icon. The helm is also magnetized with an alternative bare head allowing them to be swapped over whenever, also allows easier painting.

As I can’t keep this mini for my own collection, I’ll be using it as a guideline for my own Lamenters Company Champion when I finally get time for my own army.

August 16, 2011

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  • http://www.facebook.com/pasquale.placchetti Pasquale Placchetti

    Wow simply amazing. I have just bought myself a stripe of green stuff and am hoping what I do will turn out closely as good as your stuff. This will be my first time using green stuff so I’m just hoping it doesn’t turn out bad… My plan is to make Death Watch characters for the Role Play game… I’ve purchased a book and am hoping to get into that too. But I also like the miniature models and wanted to make some, but after looking online on how to use the green stuff… I feel out classed O.o  I was wondering if you have any tips you could send my way?

    • http://masteroftheforge.com Lamenter

      It’s very easy to become discouraged when your first attempts don’t turn out like masterpieces. My suggestion to you would be to take small steps and treat each of these steps as an experiment or test.

      Try small things to start out and use them to get used to the feel of the putty. Try different tools, lubricants and different ratios of yellow/blue mix. Don’t worry if it doesn’t turn out how you hoped, it’s just part of the learning process. Believe me, about a third of the sculpting I do with Green Stuff either gets binned or is trimmed down and sculpted over again. I tried to include lots of tips in my guide to making an Artscale Space Marine: http://masteroftheforge.com/2011/08/21/how-to-make-an-artscale-space-marine/

      If you’re planning on sculpting whole figures you’d do well to check out the sculpting guides at http://miniaturementor.com/

      Good luck with it. Remember sculpting is much like painting, it takes a lot of practice and patience for most of us.

  • http://www.facebook.com/pasquale.placchetti Pasquale Placchetti

    Wow simply amazing. I have just bought myself a stripe of green stuff
    and am hoping what I do will turn out closely as good as your stuff.
    This will be my first time using green stuff so I’m just hoping it
    doesn’t turn out bad… My plan is to make Death Watch characters for
    the Role Play game… I’ve purchased a book and am hoping to get into
    that too. But I also like the miniature models and wanted to make some,
    but after looking online on how to use the green stuff… I feel out
    classed O.o  I was wondering if you have any tips you could send my way?

  • Anonymous

    how did you make the pipes and tubes?

  • Anonymous

    how did you make the pipes and tubes?

  • Erich

    Any word on the charity auction?

    • http://masteroftheforge.com Lamenter

      Volomir’s schedule is very busy at the moment, so I’m not going to rush him over it.

      I may very well do something else for charity before it is ready to go up for auction.

  • humbrade

    Hey, where’d you get that shield from?

    • humbrade

      I ask because I’m looking to make an Art Scale Deathwatch, Black Templar Champion and would love to put a shield on it but have trouble finding one big enough…

    • http://masteroftheforge.com Lamenter

      The shield is a Forgeworld Black Templar shield that’s had all the detail sanded off. If you try to do the same sand it under a running tap to avoid the toxic resin dust.

      • humbrade

        Thanks mate, going to look for it now.

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