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Liquid Blu-Stuff

So I’ve got a new product to compliment the original Blu-Stuff molding putty. This Liquid Blu-Stuff (I may yet change the name) is just as easy to use as the putty, is non-toxic, and cures incredibly quickly compared to many other silicone rubbers (at least that I know of). Unlike the Blu-Stuff putty which is great for casting clays and putties because it cures firm, this new Liquid Blu-Stuff cures into a soft rubber, making it better suited for casting resins and plasters.

I’ve made an introductory video to show just how easy it is to use.

Another nice thing about this material is that is can be used as a casting material should you have a reason for making a cast in soft bouncy rubber (original Blu-Stuff works as a great mold for casting Liquid Blu-Stuff as it happens), though I’m struggling to think of anything I want to cast in rubber (vehicle wheels maybe). Still need to try out pigments with this material.

One of the first things I tried with the Liquid Blu-Stuff was molding the series of feathers I had made for the Doombull project. I began by building a simple container from Lego in which to pour the Liquid Blu-Stuff.

Liquid Blu-Stuff comes in two capped bottles (100ml each) which are very simple to pour from.

In this instance I did a test run with water in the lego mold container to check what volume of liquid I would need. I then simply poured in equal amounts of Liquid Blu-Stuff into a pot I had handy (product is supplied with two measuring pots) and mixed with a wooden stick until one consistent light blue colour.

This is then poured into the mold, letting it fill up slowly from one end.

The great thing about this stuff is it’s really easy to use and only takes 15 minutes to cure. It’s too soft to be used with epoxy putties like Green Stuff, but works wonderfully with resin (another post coming soon about my use of resin).

March 5, 2012

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  • Kris

    I so want some of this!

    What is it actually called though?

    Because I know that Blu-stuff is silicone putty is it? But can’t work out what this would be called…

    Cheers!

    • It will be available very soon.

      It’s actually chemically very similar to Blu-Stuff, both are silicone rubbers technically.

      I’m calling it Liquid Blu-Stuff for now, though I may change the name if I think of something better.

      Anyone care to make a suggestion for a good name (must include Blu-Stuff in it). If I use your suggestion I’ll send out a batch to you for free.

  • Erich

    looks Like a very good product I cant wait to order some!! Any pictures on Sanguinius yet?

  • Kris

    Blu-Stuff in a bottle?

  • Anthony

    I really like the molds I am getting with the liquid blu-stuff.   I have had an issue though and I think its with the resin I am trying to poor into the mold.  I tried Smooth-On 300.  I am not getting clean casts and I think its actually destroying the mold.  I know that Smooth-On 300 has warnings that it gets very hot while curing.  I think it might be destroying the mold to some extent as it seems to turn the mold kind of mushy and the resin never fully cures.  I get this resin or mold and resin together as this “goop” against the side of the mold.  The resin is supposed to be cured enough to remove from the mold after 10 minutes but even after 6 hours of cure time I still have all this goop.

    This is my long way of asking if you have a resin you recommend?  Or maybe I am doing something wrong?

    • Sorry to hear you’re having issues.

      I’ve not used Smooth-On myself either with this product or other mold making materials. My initial thoughts are that it is one of two things.

      It may be that the Smooth-On is ridiculously hot for extended periods of time and this is affecting the Blu-Stuff Rubber. I have tested the cured rubber with boiling water and saw no change in the material, but even the Smooth-On 300 PDF (http://www.smooth-on.com/tb/files/Smooth-Cast_300q,_300,_305___310.pdf) says nothing about the actual temperature it reaches.

      My second thought is that this is a chemical reaction rather than an issue of heat. Perhaps some chemical in the product is breaking down the rubber.

      I shall put a warning on the Blu-Stuff product that it shouldn’t be used with Smooth-On later today.

      The resin I’ve been using recently is Amazing Resin from Alumilite (http://www.alumilite.com/ProdDetail.cfm?Category=Casting%20Resins&Name=Amazing%20Casting%20Resin). It’s very easy to use, cures quickly and I’ve had fewer issues with air bubbles too. It is more expensive than a lot of other resins but at the same time better suited to a simple “home” setup that lacks vacuum chambers or pressure pots.

  • Bza

    Hi there,

    I was wondering if your liquid Blu-Stuff is suitable for casting components using it as the casting material in a mold made from Insta-Mold?

    To go into more detail for my question; my situation is that I’ve made the underlying structure of some dynamically posed wings for a Griffin I’m working on (the structure includes the musculature and membrane webbing over a skeleton made of sprue pieces) but they need to be covered in feathers.

    Rather than sculpting them all individually I wanted to try casting some existing feathered wings I have and then glue these layers of flat feather castings onto the surface of the wings.

    However, the one-piece, single-sided Insta-Mold molds I have taken of the feathered wings appear to have captured all the detail, but don’t seem to be working very well with green stuff, I think it might be the curved shapes.

    Do you think pouring liquid Blu-Stuff into these molds could make for a better casting? I was thinking that as well as filling the mold properly and capturing all the detail it might actually be advantageous if the feather castings were flexible so I can curve them to the shape of the wings when gluing them in place; do you think this will work as long as there is a solid wing structure behind the rubber castings for them to cling on to? I’m not thinking of casting feathers individually but rather one side of a whole wing and then cutting chunks from these “wing sheets” to layer onto my wing armatures.

    Thoughts?

    • Apologies for the slow response, I’ve been unable to get to this until today.

      Sure you can, but I’d think it creates more problems if you intend to paint them. I would suggest sticking with an epoxy putty cast but applying it to the skeleton frame before it have fully cured and still has a bit of flexibility.

      Greenstuff on it’s own can sometimes be difficult to use as a casting material so you may way to try an alternative or mixing it with an alternative (Milliput and Magic Sculp being the two most obvious to me).

      Feel free to email me some pics, maybe I can offer further advice.

      • Bza

        Hey thanks for the response! I’ve ordered a bunch of different putties including the two you mentioned. The Milliput already showed up and I tried it and the results are much better, so thanks very much for the suggestion!